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>> this week on moyers & company astrophysicist neil degrasse tyson on science, god and the universe. >> if god is the mystery of the universe, these mysteries, which we're tackling these mysteries one by one. if you're going to stay religious at the end of the conversation, god has to mean more to you than just where science has yet to tread. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- anne gumowitz, encouraging the renewal of democracy. carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the ford foundation, working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the kohlberg foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole co
. stem education includes the academic fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. they first heard from directors the firstorg, organization to hold robotics competitions. they also heard from a panel of high school students who took part in the program. this is about two hours 45 minutes. subcommittee on research and technology will come to order. good morning, everyone, welcome to today's hearing titled private sector programs that engage students in stem, which we all know is an important subject. in front of your packets containing the written testimony, biography, and disclosures for today's witnesses. i now recognize myself for five minutes for an opening statement. i am happy to call to order the first research and subcommittee technology hearing of the new year. today we learn about private sector initiatives in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and how these companies, businesses, and organizations engage students in these important yields. a report released by the national science board in 2012 indicates the science and engineer
people in science and technology gives me hope. it helped me discover my passion for engineering, and because of first, i can't say i can't -- i want to pursue electrical engineering as a career. i have applied to several schools in virginia and the nation, and i hope my stint with first will give me an edge up in admissions. i'm sure the skills i learned with first will serve me well with my studies and beyond. >> thank you very much, and i'm sure they will. >> i first learned about first in 2004. firster -- provided the opportunity to provide solutions to real challenges. as we complete the challenge we also learn viable skills like teambuilding, communication, leadership, and stem. i've refined my ability to seek my solutions for problems and develop my own desire to learn. working with robots has helped the learn about idea development, metallics, metalworking and motors by applying concept i learned in the classroom to a real-life problem. challengegiven us a each year and then we go to the process of brainstorming, designing to my prototyping, building, and rebuilding multi
science. >> hi guys welcome back to another week of techknow where we're going to show you some pretty fun innovations in science. i'm here with marita and rachelle. hi, nasa seekers mission, this is a gc-8, loaded with millions of dollars of equipment measuring the air as we're flying through the gulf. it was a pretty incredible experience. let's take a look. ists 7:30 in the morning and -- it's 7:30 in the morning. and hangar 9 is buzzing with excitement. >> any last questions about what we're going to be doing today? save jet. >> from a distance our plane looks like any other. but close up you can see it's anything but. i'm minutes away from boarding this plain with nasa experimentalists. it is a nasa gc-8, trying to measure the pollution and the atmosphere. it's a three pronged attack. the signs of the tc 8, after the u 2 spy plane. the er 2 application is a sight to see. everything about it has the feeling of a flight to space. the men who fly the plane undergo special training and wear a pressurized flight soot. several weather probes collect the information and beam it back to earth
phony science, the way they did on tobacco. >> can we have some quiet? our colleagues are talking here. >> so when people pick out what one particular scientist said, it's important to look at that in a context of where the bulk of the science is. and if you don't believe science, then perhaps my friends from the other side will believe in big corporations. and one really big corporation that cares a lot about the climate's effect on storms, the entire insurance industry and the property casualty industry are virtually up in arms about what climate change is doing to their risk profile, and here is a graph that munich reed puts together showing the increase in natural catastrophes worldwide that are associated with climate change, a, in the sense that they're happening while climate change is happening. but b, and that we know some underlying science. we know, for instance, it is not disputed, that if you warm the oh, it creates more energy going up into storms, and that makes stronger storms when they hit the shore. so much of the science is way past debate, and if you simply take the
will have, orb debate the validity of the claim that the science is already settled. in fact, there are white house talking points to that effect. however, these are topics that must be discussed. now, while the current epa administrator argues the plan is part of an overall strategy positioning the u.s. for leadership in international discussions, the predecessor clearly argued such action would have no impact without international participation first. the administration is moving forward with a domestic agenda that will clearly damage our ability to utilize our abundant energy resources and to support the growth of manufacturing jobs. i'm afraid these policies just show the international community three things. how to undermine chances of economic recovery and growth. how to achieve the lowest workforce participation rate since the carter administration. and how to increase energy prices by denying the ability to utilize all energy resources. while these policies were squarely rejected by congress in 2009, since then, president has simply sought to legislate them. president
the intersection of hardware and humanity and we're doing it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. hard core in other words: marita davidson, is a scientist, specializing in ecology and evolution. testing a meat substitute that claims to taste like the same thing. >> it does taste like chicken. >> we've put it to a test. >> dr. crystal dilworth is a molecular neuroscientist. the science of greats. e-cigarettes. kyle hill is an engineer and i'm phil torres. ill i'm an entomologist. that's our show now let's do some science. ♪ ♪ >> hi guys, welcome to "techknow". i'm phil torres and i'm here with kyle, marita and crystal. now guys, as an entomologist, i love a good challenge in the field. there is a scientific mystery that i went to the peruvian amazon to solve. there is this weird structure. >> what is that? >> we went down there in the fact that this thing had been found in one place twice. one of the best thing about working in the amazon rain forest is the road along the way to uncovering the scientific mysteries. join me on the expedition that's about to get
debates are focused on science instead of solutions. our debates focus on back sliding current clean air laws instead of improving them. we're back to debating whether we can have a robust economy or clean environment. history has shown this is a false choice. as congress fights over what to do our communities are feeling the first tastes of the harmful effects through record droughts and storms. coastal communities like those in my own state of delaware, vulnerable as oceans slowly rise and more extreme storms like super storm stan difficult hit our coasts. these climate impacts are costing our country not just in lives impacted but in true economic costs. in fact, for the first time in history the government accountability office last year listed climate change as one of the biggest fiscal risks facing our country in the annual high risk reports of the gao. federal emergency management agency alone obligated over $80 billion in federal assistance for disasters declared in disasters through 2004 and 2011. despite the warnings and reality, congress remains gridlocked over this issue, ove
will attract investment from one engineering companies due to development of acapulco science including development of genetically modified crops external become one of the major exporters of agricultural products. with the concepts the open according to the cause of the transition to a green economy by two thousand thirty fifteen percent of the initial use water saving technologies we need to develop acapulco science to create experimental agro innovation clusters do with it but well above the room special attention was given to deviations for new investments will be fully used for new technology screens for design and engineering centers will be established in cooperation with foreign companies the largest cities in the country such as os to all my teaching him enough to be become the first modern urban centers. moreover the city's will turn into the centers of science investment attraction and population. the president also cover the sector economy the introduction of knowledge based economy. one increase the share of non energy products and cause extends export potential of up to se
. the intersection of science and technology. marita davidson, is a scientist, a meat substitute that claims to taste like the same thing. >> it does taste like chicken. >> dr. crystal dilworth is a molecular neuroscientist. what's the real science between this? kyle hill is an engineer and i'm phil torres. ill i'm an entomologist. spiders, one builds its own decoy, another one spins its own web. that's our team, let's do some science. ♪ sneets ♪ >> hi guys, welcome to "techknow". i'm phil torres and i'm here with kyle, marita and crystal. i love a big challenge in the field. there is a mystery that i went to the per yo youuvian amazon. one of the best thing about working in the amazon rain forest is the road along the way. join me on the expedition that's about to get wet, wild and a little bit muddy. the peruvian amazon, a huge population of endemic plant and animal species, meaning they are found nowhere else on the earth. this makes it one of the most beautiful and pristine places around. about six months ago the researcher here at the tamba pata research center took a picture and posted it
earthquake. it's a 50's era building and as you can imagine especially with science centric facilities something designed at that time is not consistent with modern science and technology and to that end we are catapulting to the 20th century for the facilities for medical examiner and forensic services. in regard to medical examiner facility we have secured a facility in indian basin. they're going to alter the facility there to yield us more area. i believe at the hall they occupy about 18,000 square feet. we're going to provide them just shy of 50,000 at one newhall and we are catapulting from mid50's era to a 20th century. the dna which the chief mentioned didn't exist as a science in 1955. it's predominant today and much of the facility is dedicated to dna and similar science and making sure we're able to provide the proper consideration of evidence for the purposes of exoneration or conviction as the evidence might suggest or recommend so it's a critical purpose to address and this facility will yield the venue for that service to r occur. we have spent monies toward develop
's only important to the extent that it's bringing more awareness to the uncertainty of the science around the debate. when you go back and look at the temperature projections from climate models and compare them to actual temperatures, two things are readily evident. first, temperatures have flat lined over the last 15 years, and secondly, an average of over 100 climate models from the last decade show that the scientific community did not predict this would happen. to my knowledge, not a single climate model ever predicted that a pause in global warming would ever occur. senator sessions is going to go deeper into this. the truth completely contradicts the president's statement and begs the question as to why he and the epa not only continue to deny the truth but why it has raced to stop this information from disseminating into scientific record. what i'm referring to is the administration's effort with other nations to lobby the ipcc to back up the president's statement in the most recent report. and while i did not think the ipcc explanation was sufficient, i have to at least give them
to be dismissive and proposals like this, but we know and frankly the science really can be refuted and this is a critical, public health pleasure and we know, that we have a growing healthcare epidemic in this country, including among our kids, a various health that are distributely atribable to sugary beverage and particularly the growth of type two diabetes to the point where the sugary befrage consumption, and one in three will develop it in their lifetime and that is one in three and that is a healthcare catastrophe for this country and we know that they present a unique risk of health risk, and that is, worse than all of the food that has sugar in it. we know that our diet is being overwhelmed with calories from sugarry beverages that the way that the beverages are absorbed into the body is different than the sugary food that it does not turn off your appetite that you can consume huge amounts of sugar without ever feeling full we, know that one 12-ounce can of soda can have ten tea spoons of sugar and a big gul p can have 50 tea spoons this is a risk that is different in-kind
about, in the world of science we talk about robust evidence. that means evidence that applies in numerous areas and points to the same conclusions. the evidence around taxation is that it works in all areas from alcohol to tobacco to sugar sweet and beverages. the policy that you are considering here and especially the threshold of a $0.02 per ounce tax is highly valid, it has tremendous support in a large body quasi experimental epideem logical research. at the level of medical science, i want to hit on a few words that were not hit on as it possibly could have been from the report of the budget and legislative analyst office. the first has to do with what we are learning and this is fairly new research but very much a growing consensus among scientist especially those funding by national health, the world health organization, the research that doesn't have a particular agenda behind it but it's neutral and objective research about the effects of sugar and added sugar and particularly sugary beverages on human health. one of the newer set of findings, with tremendous amount o
of students about subjects like science and math. how can kids across the country get involved in captain planet? >> well, the best way is to invite everyone to go online -- so parents, teachers, youth -- and investigate and see how they can get their school to apply for a captain planet grant. >> we have a link on our "teen kids news" website. >> all right, you guys. was this hard work or fun today? >> all: fun! >> a class trip like this is certainly fun, but it can also be the beginning of a journey to find the scientist of the future. for "teen kids news," i'm carly. >> okay, everyone. it's time to find out what teens think. here's "speak of the week." >> of all the subjects you take in school, which do you think is the most useful? >> i say u.s. history because you get to learn about the past, and you're ready to set for the future. >> as much as i hate it, i think math is because you really use it for everything that you even come across. >> i feel that biology and the sciences are most important to learn because i believe that one should have an understanding of themselves and how t
to our science and technology correspondent, jacob ward. >> reporter: pph is a polyglycol ether. it was in the literature that they handed officials this morning. they warned of it being a skin irritant and has less oral toxicity than the chemical we have seen released but it is very bad for the skin. to have this in one's bathing water would be quite bad. >> we'll continue to follow the story throughout the day and bring more details as they warrant. the affected area, has the largest cumulation of chemical makers than anywhere else, and there have been mistakes, mishaps. dupont would pay a settlement to members of a town that they claim was contaminated with chemicals. >>> the east coast continues to dig out after that massive winter blast. the latest storm coming with heavy snows, strong winds and it left behind some very, very cold temperatures. donachie outside of penn station in new york, john, the largest commuter railroad in the country and travel has been a nightmare all day long. >> it sure has. penn station, right behind me. basically new jersey transit running a sund
's imagination, that -- gene's imagination that would use science fiction as a metaphor for the various social, environmental, political issues of the time. and the tv series dealt with the issues back in the '60s, mid 20th century. but somehow, those same episodes resonate to our times today. >> i'm told that your favorite episode of star trek is the naked time, is that correct? >> that's my favorite. >> why is that? >> well, you know, you get tired of is iting at that console saying aye aye sir, warp 3. and occasionally you get to say aye aye sir, warp 9. you're all tense. finally i got liberated from that could b console, ripped ofy shirt and demonstrated my swash buckling prowess. >> right after this ... al jazeera america. we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. >> we pursue that story beyond the headline, pass the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capital. >> we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. >> and fol
research to help end the recurrent of breast cancer. will the science support the stock's staggering run or could the trials come up empty. cramer talks to the ceo all coming up on "mad money." >> don't miss a second of "mad money" follow on twitter. have a question, tweet cramer, mad tweets and send jim an e-mail or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. i jus, i combined home and auto with state farm, saved 760 bucks. love this guy. okay, does it bother anybody else that the mime is talking? frrreeeeaky! [ male announcer ] bundle home and auto and you could save 760 bucks. alright, mama, let's get going. [ yawns ] naptime is calling my name. [ male announcer ] get to a better state. state farm. >>> more than your personal data than ever is floating in the crowd. they had their credit card numbers stole bin hackers last month along with a similar data breach at neiman marcus, it's worth thinking how we protect our sensitive information and who wins in this information where no one's info is safe. i don't have zper tease in identity theft but i do kn
a bright light on the sugary beverage industry, and in supporting this resolution, the science, speaks for itself. and we know what it is, we know what it is doing to our children, and we know what that means for our children between 7:30 and 2:40 when they are with us every day, thank you. >> good evening, superintendent and commissioners, my name is mark and i am a teacher and on special assignment in the community support department and once a week, i have the joy of working at tender loin community school, this thursday i will be teaching two first grade classes about the importance of drinking tap water and eating whole fruits and vegetables and not consuming sugary beverage and we will be using otter who loves to drink water. first graders do a good job at filling in the blanks. so, i am here to encourage the members of the board to unanimously support this resolution, this resolution alines with and supports our work in addressing the health disparties and over weight and diabetes and heart disease in the school communities and it alines with the tier one plan and the multitiere
's founder. nchtsds commuter science or basic programs will be as important a skill as being able to do basic reading and writing. >> but girls aren't getting the training they need. how to fix it, next. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that won't trap me in a rate. that's correct. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark? go get help! i have my reasons. look, you don't have to feel trapped with our raise your rate cd. if our rate on this cd goes up, yours can too. oh that sounds nice. don't feel trapped with the ally raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. life with crohn's disease ois a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps come back? what if the plane gets delayed? what if i can't hide my symptoms? what if? but what if the most important question is the one you're not asking? what if the underlying cause of your symptoms is damaging inflammation? for help getting the answers you need, talk to your doctor and visit crohnsandcolitisinfo.com to get your complimentary q&a book, with information from experts on your con
unemployment has seen record -- [inaudible] given that life sciences barred engines for growth, was support with the government give to realize our plan of a life-size cluster based around these world-renowned centers of excellence? >> i think my right honorable friend makes a very good point about the strength that sutton has. obviously, we've got the box to attract life science businesses to britain. would also got the investment in apprenticeships. that is important. and, of course, the office of life science as he knows bring the business department help the apartment together to help bring life sciences jobs here, working with local enterprise partnerships i think there's a great opportunity for more investment in these important businesses. >> the market dawkins inquest concluded last week with a verdict of unlawful killing but it also found errors in the police investigation. last week also saw wallis admitting he lied about the right honorable member. does the prime minister except it is the urgent that we reform the independent police complaints commission for? >> first of all can
help. mom was just with the creature was it external increase science funding in the address to the nation the president of kazakhstan in the sultanate survive noted that in the sectors of the economy will require an increase in science funding but less than three percent of gdp according to him. it is necessary to support research and innovation in the commercialization of scientific developments the government was instructed to develop and submit to the parliament a package of relevant bills which is deadline until september first. does a specific plan of gradual science funding increase for specific moments in discovery's will allow approaching indicators of developed countries to and from behind and in a phone in boyhood team the president has said urgent task in the field of innovation and research. he noted that not all countries can develop the nation's therefore is necessary to build a realistic and pragmatic strategy. this requires a separate scientific base that can actively participate in large scale international research projects. this will enable our scientists
need to know what the science tells us. the science of public health. so, i think the president needs to speak to his nih director in charge of drug abuse, nora volcow. because she would tell the president that, in fact, today's modern, genetically modified marijuana, so it's much higher thc levels, far surpass the marijuana that the president acknowledges smoking when he was a young person, so that he is wrong when he says that it isn't very harmful, because the new marijuana is not the old marijuana, and, of course, the president is making this decision based upon his anecdotal experience. we need to have presidential decisions made, based upon public health and the sound science that the federal government's invested in, which shows that this is very harmful. in fact, as my cousin, chris, just mentioned, if it's legalized, we know rates of use will increase. availability will increase. and accessibility. and as you know, chris, if you have a predisposition to addiction, this is going to be a gateway. and, frankly, chris, it's a harmful drug in and of itself. like, i was lucky, chri
to the extent that peer reviewed science and modeling allows because of the senator and his efforts to have us relook at whole economy modeling, we're pulling together an expert panel to continue to look at these issues. >> that's good. can we say we will not implement the rules until we have the information? >> well, we actually provide a significant amount of information. whole economy modeling is appropriate for some rules and not others. we believe we are complying with that portion of the clean air act at this point. >> and from this point on, and maybe you've done it in the past. we are not going to activate the regulations until such time as we know the effect it will have on jobs and the economy. >> senator, when we do rules, we'll do it to the full extent that the analysis can be done in a way that's consistent with the requirements. >> that's good. we will be looking forward as the clock moves onto make sure that is being done. mr. ash, first i want to thank you on the record again for all the cooperation you've been on your word to approve the range wide plan on oil and gas. we have
from 32 to $44 and i'm wondering if that's based on the science and the fact that the officers are running -- >> there is a lot of value there. we got to take a hard look at itt. maybe for the show, i think it's a really good idea. i have been digging into it and i like what i see so far. john in florida, john? >> caller: john in florida. >> hey, man, how are you. >> caller: jim, with your permission i'd like to say hello to my son john christopher. my stock which i'm interested in is tear lab. >> i got to go back and look at that. i got to do more work. i don't like the action so to speak. can i go to bill in north dakota. >> caller: hi, jim. booyah. my question is about emerald oil. we recently initiated coverage and global hunter upgraded it to a buy and last week they picked up 20,000 more acres on which to drill and we have a couple more rigs coming on line and the pipeline. >> my problem with this is i have some stocks and it is so darn cheap and yet it won't go up so i can't do down the food chain to emerald. i reiterate buy but it doesn't act like a buy. i need to go to
a florentine artist, and leonardo was not a court favorite. his interest in the natural sciences was puzzling to the court. this drawing probably suggests something of his mental conflict. it is a sketch for the adoration, but in the corner there is a design for a hydrometer, a device for measuring the amount of moisture in the air. one would think that scientific instruments and nude drawings could have little in common, but in leonardo's mind they existed side by side. there was little understanding at the florentine court for this kind of scientific curiosity in a man of the arts, but leonardo continued to pursue his own line of development. milan was a new wod to leonardo, and he went there filled with confidence, hoping to be able to do there many of the things that he could not do in florence. he was to remain in the north for the next 17 years. the sforza castle was an armed fortress as difficult to capture as it was to defend, yet inside those thick walls, leonardo enjoyed the company of some of the leading artists and scientists of the day, for it was, despite its grim appearance, a
biopharma is behind research to help end the recurrence of breast cancer. will the science support the stock's staggering run or could the trials come up empty? cramer talks to the ceo all coming up on "mad money." >> don't miss a second of "mad money" follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question, tweet cramer, #madtweets and send jim an e-mail or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. >>> in a world where more than your personal data than ever is floating in the cloud, they had their credit card numbers stolen by hackers last month along with a similar data breach at neiman marcus, it's worth thinking how we protect our sensitive information and who wins in this environment where no one's info is safe. i don't have expertise in identity theft but i do know about stocks. lifelock provides identity theft protection services. sign up with them and the company will continuously monitor your credit and identity related events so they can alert you if you have any fraudulent activity. in october 2.9 million subscribers and i think that will go higher. let me
, this hearing is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] >> up and asked a house science and technology committee investigates cybersecurity concerns with healthcare.gov website. secretary of state john kerry is meeting with his counterparts from canada and mexico to discuss revisions to the north american free trade agreement. he will talk with reporters after the meeting and we will have live coverage here on c-span2. president obama will announce changes to government surveillance programs and data collection. the president is expected to focus on steps to increase oversight and transparency. we will have live coverage from the justice department at 11 a.m. eastern on c-span. in the afternoon also on c-span, we will get reaction to the president's speech and proposed changes to federal surveillance programs. a former cia analyst and a british defense official will be at the brookings institution. live coverage begins at 2 p.m. eastern. next, cybersecurity and i.t. officials testified about whether people's personal information is secure at the healthcare.gov website. this house science and tec
with an extraordinary self-education philosophy and political thought and science. being countered benjamin franklin the representative of the american colleges in britain and franklin got to know him a little, very little and suggested to him that he should try starting over and going to america. paine quickly became an important figure in intellectual circles in philadelphia. he was the editor of a small magazine called the pennsylvania magazine, a writer and as the american revolution began to brew he became a very important retorts edition in the struggle. he wrote common sense, the great pamphlet that persuaded so many people to -- any but the crisis papers. i think it's fair to call him a member of the founding generation and 10 years later less known to us americans paine went to france and became an important spokesman for the french revolutionaries. really their great champion to the english-speaking world. he rate made the case to the radicalism to french and british audiences. he was a believer in the need to break with the past in order to undo the terrible injustices that the european r
he's got the dirtiest job and the science that can revolutionize indians's dairy farms. michelle nixon, and i'm phil tors. that' torrez and let's do some science. >> we are back for another exciting show and lindsay you can start us off. this is important to you as a mother. >> i did a story on ballistic backpacks and bulletproof backpacks. one being a former cia officer who thinks any layer of added security is good and one as a mom in do i really want to give my kids the idea that this kind of technology is going to keep them safe? let's have a look. >> as a former cia agent i learned how to shoot a variety of guns. so when techknow asked me to cover a story about the trend in bulletproof back to school supplies, it intrigued me. as a former operative and as a mom. back to school shopping it's always the most stressful time of year for parents like me who are not prepared and now we've got one more thing to worry about: some parents are buying items like this insert intended to bulletproof backpacks to their back to school shopping list. in the wake of the sandy hook shooting,
have to do is pretty straight forward is put out the facts and the science. the facts and the science around sugary beverages are straight forward and compelling. we know that we've had an explosion in diabetes, obesity and other health ailments related to sugary beverages. we know that in percentage of calories in our diet in terms of beverages has exploded just in terms of proportion of calories from sugar. the contribution to sugary beverages is almost half. we used to call it onset adult diabetes but we don't because these beverages are given to our kids. we know through scientific studies this kind of tax will reduce consumption of beverages and will save lives. we know that we are facing huge massive cost to the point where there are hospitals who are concerned about the future financial viability given to the explosion of diabetes. despite the claims and argues about sugary beverage tax is a regressive tax, it's a much higher tax that will affect these communities. this is a tax supported by scientific evidence by knowledge and i'm glad we have brought this forth with the boa
this be brought back to a more intellectual discussion, where we look at the social and medical science data, we have a growing body of evidence showing associations between explicit and violent outcome and conduct in young people. i think it would be more progressive of us to revise our book selection policies to be more in keeping with the new knowledge we have of neuroscience psychology medical science. the american academy of pediatrics has actually in one of their most recent policy statements urged schools to keep pace with modern media, an be more selective in what they are chattanooga choosing, because of the potential for harm, that it has the ability to harm in our district -- >> when you say harm -- hang on, i want to hear from jill. what kind of harm are you talking about? >> we know that explicit content, violent content is linked to a whole host of negative outcomes, whether it changes beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, aggressive behavior we have a real problem in this country with teen rape for instance. some of this material validates that, legitimizes that and it's concerning. we h
- a regular amount of dopamine and here is where my weak spot is. i was bad at maths and science. >> here you are depending on both. >> yes. here i am, you know, talking about something - an operation that is - it's mysterious, actually. maybe i'm making - putting myself down too hard. i will always love that. because in a way that it's really not very well-known, exactly why this works as well as it does. i mean, there's so much study to be done on the brain that in 50 years i can well imagine this not being the situation at all. >> the treatment is so general, the signal sent to the brain is blanket. >> they are different targets in the brain to aim for. one you aim for a person depending on his personality and the skills, word skills or search and memory recall. so you can - so one person will have one target, another person another. since i'm basically a verbal person, there's one target for me that may be different for another person. em, you were going to say -- >> i don't think the neuroproduces dopamine, i think it regulates the action. >> this is what happens when you are a writer. n
science here. so you know if you've got the l.a. beast on your screen, something is going to be eaten. this is the toothpaste sandwich challenge, inspired by al bundy from "married with children". what the challenge is -- what this -- oh. [ bleep ]. two slices of -- [ bleep ]. i can't do it. he -- >> let us guess. opens the toothpaste, puts the toothpaste on the bread, slathers it on. two full tubes. >> two full tubes. >> gross. >> you're right. you're right. >> are you going to be able to brush your teeth? >> [ bleep ]. >> now you're wondering. >> what's the science? >> right. wondering why there's a giant jug of orange juice there, that's the second part of the challenge. >> are they going to tell us why orange juice tastes so bad after? >> yes. >> toothpaste contains sodium sulfate. you're getting the sulfate on your tongue, that blocks the bitterness inhibitors on your tongue. this makes the orange juice mad bitter. >> you're only tasting a portion of the orange juice then, because part of the taste buds are blocked. >> you're tasting the bitter part of it. the part of the tongue
work with usc f now we have bio life companies 50 in mission bay are bio life scientists science. we have some at gladstone and terry at bear and others. you've got 25 hundred usc f faculty and techs. when he said we'll build it and they come if we took an infrastructure approach and built the infrastructure that a new sector low merger and it has. when you see did pharmaceutical companies here with the hospital it will open in 2015 and another hotel pop up and family houseraising money at the stephen's house the other day it will house families to come through the treatment but you'll also see the innovation reflected here. i'm glad to see ray cell here. your not only in the morning an incubator but a inventor to get together with other tech companies and introduce them to the relationship he's pr this is what mission bay is all about no matter where here in hospitality or manufacturing and now in digital health care. i love this blend. i was introduced to this when i was talked about this and she introduced the idea to put all the health data symbol clouds and allow us to astronome
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